Animal Bites and Insect Stings

How do I treat animal bites and scratches?

If you or your child gets a bite, follow these steps to treat the wound:

  • Hold a towel or cotton on the area to stop the bleeding.
  • Clean the wound with soap and water.
  • Cover it with a clean bandage or gauze pad.

How do I treat bee, wasp, and other insect stings?

Here’s what to do:

  • If the insect has left behind a stinger, remove it from the skin so less of the venom gets into your body. Don’t squeeze the stinger. You might release more of the venom into your skin.
  • Once the stinger is out or if there is no stinger, wash the area around the sting with soap and water.
  • Hold an ice pack or cool washcloth to the sting to stop it from swelling.
  • Spread calamine lotion or baking soda mixed with water to relieve pain.
  • To prevent itching, use a spray or cream containing hydrocortisone or antihistamine.

How do I treat a mosquito bite?

Here’s what to do:

  • Apply firm pressure to the bite for 10 seconds to help stop the itch.
  • Use a baking soda paste or hydrocortisone cream 4 times a day to relieve itching. Don’t have either on hand?
  • Holding ice or a wet washcloth on the bite will also help.
  • Take an antihistamine if the bite is very itchy.

How do I treat a spider bite?

For most of the harmless types of spiders, you’ll find at home, treatment is pretty simple:

  • Wash the area with soap and water.
  • Hold an ice pack or cool washcloth to the bite to relieve pain and bring down swelling.

When should I see a doctor for an animal bite?

For any animal bite, you may need an antibiotic to prevent infection. So, it’s always a good idea to call your doctor, especially if you have medical conditions that weaken your immune system:

  • The bite was caused by an unknown animal, or by any wild animal like a raccoon, skunk, or bat. You may need tetanus or rabies vaccine.
  • The bite is large, or it doesn’t stop bleeding after you’ve held pressure on it for 15 minutes. It may need to be closed with stitches.
  • You think the bite may have damaged a bone, tendons, or nerves because you can’t bend or straighten the body part or you’ve lost feeling in it.
  • The wound is red, swollen, or oozing fluid.

What are the signs that the child is allergic to the insect?

It’s normal for the skin around the insect sting to swell up and get red. But go to the emergency room if you see any of these signs of an allergic reaction:

  • Dizziness
  • Hives — red, itchy bumps on the skin
  • Stomach cramps, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • Swelling of the tongue
  • Trouble breathing, wheezing

Anyone who has allergies to bees, wasps, or other stinging insects should keep an epinephrine auto-injector at home, work, and school in case of a sting.

How do I know if a spider is poisonous?

Spiders might be creepy and crawly, but most of them aren’t poisonous. The poisonous spiders to watch out for are the brown recluse and black widow. Here’s how to spot them:

  • Brown recluse spiders are about 1/2-inch long. They’re brown and have a mark in the shape of a violin on their back.
  • Black widow spiders are black with a red hourglass-shaped mark on their stomach.

What should I do for a poisonous spider bite?

If you think you were bitten by a poisonous spider like a brown recluse or black widow, go to the doctor. Look for these signs:

  • A red or purple color around the bite
  • Pain in the bite area
  • Swelling around the bite
  • Muscle pain and cramps
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Rash
  • Stomach pain
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Trouble breathing

How to treat a Minor Cut or Scrape?

Cuts and Scrapes

Follow these steps to keep cuts clean and prevent infections and scars:

Wash your hands – First, wash up with soap and water so you don’t get bacteria into the cut and cause an infection. You can also use hand sanitizer.

Stop the bleeding – Put pressure on the cut so that it will stop bleeding, keep the pressure on for a few minutes.

Clean the wound – Once you’ve stopped the bleeding, rinse the cut under cool running water and clean the area around the wound with soap and a wet washcloth.

Remove any dirt or debris – Use a pair of tweezers cleaned with alcohol to gently pick out any dirt, gravel, glass, or other material in the cut.

Do I need to bandage a cut or scrape?

You don’t need to bandage every cut and scrape. Some heal more quickly when left uncovered to stay dry. But if the cut is on a part of the body that might get dirty or rub against clothes, put on a bandage to protect it. Change the bandage regularly so that it will not get infected.

How long should a cut or scrape be covered?

Once a solid scab has formed, you can take off the bandage.

When do I need to call my doctor?

Check with your doctor or go to the emergency room if:

  • The cut is deep, long, or the edges are jagged. You may need stitches and a tetanus shot.
  • The cut or scrape is from a dirty or rusty object. You may need a tetanus shot.
  • The injury is from an animal or human bite.
  • You can’t stop the bleeding with direct pressure.
  • You can’t get the dirt out of the wound.
  • The cut is on your face or near a joint, like on your fingers.
  • The skin around the cut gets red and swollen or develops red streaks.
  • Pus drains from the cut.
  • You have a fever of more than 100.4 F (in either an adult or child).

How do topical antibiotic ointments work?

Topical antibiotics are medicines you put on your skin to kill bacteria. Most cuts and scrapes will heal without ointment, but they can reduce scars and help the wound heal faster. If you do use an antibiotic ointment, apply it to your skin one to three times a day and then cover with a clean bandage.

When should I use gauze and tape?

Gauze and tape work best for large cuts and scrapes that bandages won’t cover. Ask your pharmacist which type of gauze is best for you.

How should I apply gauze and tape?

  • Wash your hands with soap and water. You can also wear gloves.
  • Gently wash the wound with a wet piece of gauze or washcloth.
  • Place a piece of clean gauze over the wound.
  • Apply tape around the edges of the gauze to hold it in place.

Create a First Aid Kit by Own

What would you do if you cut your finger while chopping vegetables? How would handle a stovetop burn, a spider bite, or a child’s scrape from a fall? Minor injuries happen every day, and most are easy to treat at home. But to handle them quickly and calmly, you need to know what to do and have the right supplies.

How do I make a first aid kit?

A well-stocked first-aid kit is a must-have for treating minor injuries at home and on the go. You can buy a first aid kit or put one together on your own. Keep your supplies in a sturdy, clear plastic box so you can see what’s inside.

What should be in my first aid kit?

  • Adhesive tape
  • Alcohol wipes
  • Allergy medicine
  • Aloe Vera Gel
  • Antibiotic ointment
  • Bandages in different sizes
  • Calamine lotion
  • Cold packs
  • Elastic bandages
  • Gauze rolls and pads
  • Hand sanitizer (for your travel first aid kit)
  • Hydrocortisone cream
  • Latex-free gloves
  • Pain relievers like acetaminophen and ibuprofen
  • Saline wound wash
  • Scissors and tweezers

Where should I store my first aid kit?

You don’t want to go searching for supplies when there’s a minor accident to tend to. Your kit should be easy to find. But it should be kept in a high, childproof cabinet, far away from kids. Keep one full-sized kit in a central spot at home, such as your kitchen or bathroom. Then put a smaller kit in your car or purse for when you’re on the road.

How often should I check my first aid kit?

Items can run out if you use them often, and medicines can expire if you rarely need them, so go through everything in your kit, and replace any empty or out-of-date items at least once a year.

Emergencies

Call on an emergency number for any medical emergency, including when a person has:

  • Chest pain
  • A serious allergic reaction
  • Bleeding that won’t stop
  • Trouble breathing

What should I do when I call an emergency number?

Tell the operator:

  • The type of emergency
  • The telephone number you’re calling from
  • The address where the emergency is happening
  • Details about the person’s condition — what happened to them, the type of injuries they have, and what has been done so far to treat them

The operator might tell you step by step how to help the person who has been injured. DO NOT HANG UP until the operator hangs up.

How can I prepare for an emergency?

  • Keep a fully stocked first-aid kit in your home and car.
  • Have up-to-date copies of each person’s medical history in your home and car.
  • Post an emergency contact sheet next to each phone in the house. Show it to everyone who spends time in your home, including family members and babysitters.
  • Make sure your children know what number to dial and what they should tell the operator.

Emergency Contact Sheet

FOR AN EMERGENCY: Dial emergency number

Police, Fire, Hospital name & Phone no., Doctor’s name & Phone no., Family Contact Name & Phone no., Address, Work number, etc.